desidere:

bellahugo:

ratchetmelancholy:

White privilege is your history being taught as a core class and mine being taught as an elective. 

please let them know.

white privilege is your history being taught as a core class, and mine being banned because it would promote "the overthrow of the U.S. government, foster racial resentment, and advocate ethnic solidarity."

Holy crap, Arizona has some truly awful people in charge of it.

Can’t even imagine what they would make of the New York curriculum and it’s coverage of history including Five Nations history and culture. Never mind that it is a vital part of understanding the history of our state, our modern country, and the world.

danverskate:

you know what? i disagree that all of fitzsimmons’ interactions in season 1 made it so clear that they’ve always had romantic feelings for each other. you saw it cause you ship them. i saw two people who love each other unconditionally and not necessarily in a romantic way.

I really resisted Mulder+Scully for a long time, because one of the things that drew me to that show was the portrayal of a man and a woman working as equals and it not immediately becoming  a relationship show.   The idea that men and women who become close MUST become romantic at some point is, frankly, poisonous (on a societal level).

pianosa2tothefighting8th:

So, please, can someone tell me why so many people are making a bigger deal of a vague threat that Ward made than the fact that he killed a lot of people?  I go back and forth on what I want for Ward’s future, but I do know that I am way more upset with him for shooting Hand, for garroting Koenig, and for dropping Fitz and Simmons out of an airplane than I am that he said something creepy to Skye.

Is Ward redeemable?  I think so, but I don’t think he has to be.  I think that is probably the way the show will go, considering the lengths they went to in demonstrating his tortured past.  I do think any of the possible outcomes can be done believably as the writers have shown a dedication to character development and Brett Dalton proved he is up to the challenge of making Ward complex.  

I don’t think the rape threat (and I think it takes a lot of rhetorical contortion to make it not be a rape threat) is worse than the killings (which were increasingly brutal and personal).  I don’t think its even worse than the stuff he did to go above and beyond (he didn’t have to tell Garrett where the secret sub-basement was; he might have killed most of those people because he was with Garrett, but he could have kept the other secrets he knew).   

When I point to the rape threat, I am responding to the narrative in which Ward’s redemption is seen to require not just the forgiveness of the team, but acceptance and romantic/sexual love from Skye.   There are two variants:  Ward redeemed via the Love Of A Good Woman (in which Skye, by “still believing in him” turns him around) or Ward’s redemption being rewarded with the Love of A Good Woman (in which him turning to the right side is automatically rewarded with Skye’s affections).   

I’m not against a redemption arc.  I expect a redemption arc at some point.   It’s a fairly obvious direction for the character, and I think it could be interesting and engaging if well done.   I just don’t want it to involve a massive re-write of Skye’s character as it has been shown us.   Her reaction to Miles betrayal in “Flower Dress” is a small-scale example - she holds people to the same high standards to which she holds herself.

Ward treated her like an object to be won; he threatened to force her to submit her personal integrity for his own pleasure — however you read that line.  She is under no obligation as a human being to act as his reward.  The actors may ship SkyeWard, but I would like that door to be closed for a very, very long time.  

(Side note: I feel similarly about FitzSimmons.  A confession of romantic love, while brave, does not earn automatic reciprocity.  Simmons is under no obligation to return his affections just because he declared them. The idea that women owe men affection simply because men ask for it is what underlies all kinds of harmful ideas, from dudes moaning about the friend zone to the idea that date rape is understandable if the dude bought dinner.)

everyfiredies:

Ben Folds Five’s “Brick” is one of those songs that gets sadder as I get older. Maybe I’m more emotional (ick) or maybe I understand the gravity of it better. Either way, excuse me while I try not to sob in Starbucks while grading essays.

Which songs mean more to you now than…

My dad was also a big Paul Simon fan, and I grew up with those albums as lullabies, as car sing-alongs, as the soundtrack of my childhood.  I sing them to my kids.   
But yeah, to be as old now as my dad was then, and have a kid now the same age I was when I first hear this lyric:

And, I know a woman
Became a wife
These are the very words she uses to describe her life
She said, “A good day
Ain’t got no rain”
She said, “A bad day’s when I lie in bed
And think of things that might have been”

I get a lot more about that than I did when I was young.

Also: Springsteen.  Almost all of it, but especially things like The River:

Now those memories come back to haunt me
They haunt me like a curse
Is a dream a lie if it don’t come true
Or is it something worse

"Psychologists have found that people’s belief in a just world helps explain how they react to innocent victims of negative life circumstances. People become cognitively frustrated when presented with stories of victims who suffer through little fault of their own. They can deal with this frustration in two ways: they can conclude that the world is an unjust place, or they can decide that the victim is somehow to blame. Most people reconcile their psychological distress by blaming the victim. Even when we know that suffering is undeserved, it is psychologically easier to blame the victim rather than give up the idea that the world is basically fair."
— Melissa Harris-Perry [x] (via aerialiste)

Favorite quote on the subject, from Babylon 5:

You know, I used to think it was awful that life was so unfair. Then I thought, wouldn’t it be much worse if life were fair, and all the terrible things that happen to us come because we actually deserve them? So, now I take great comfort in the general hostility and unfairness of the universe

"The end of last season Fitz professed his love for Simmons, and she didn’t really see it coming and didn’t feel the same in that moment. That’s something that once that moment’s happened, you can’t really go back from that in a friendship. You have to move forward, and we see how they deal with that. That moment changes them both because it was a life-threatening moment, and neither of them will be the same after going through that emotionally and physically. It was a bomb that went off, and now they have to find a way to recover."
Elizabeth Henstridge on how the Fitzsimmons dynamic is going to change in season 2 (via batsonthebrain)

Yep, and just because someone likes you, doesn’t mean you have to like them back. Reciprocation is not obligatory.

That goes double - triple - quadruple for Skye with Ward, by the way. No one is required to serve as the Healing Vagina for some dude with Feelings.

(Love Fitz. Think he was damn brave in that moment. Still don’t want Simmons to somehow magically develop feelings she didn’t have just because. It’s brave to tell someone you’re close to that your closeness has limits. )

(Source: danverskate)

laylainalaska:

fuckyeahsources:

Nope. But the real story is better. Bolding mine:

The late Ruth Thompson, a cell painter on “Snow White” who later became a multiplane scene planner, recalled: “We tried everything - airbrush, drybrush, even lipstick and rouge, which is perhaps the basis for the legend because we did, in fact, try it. But nothing worked.”
The airbrush was difficult to control on such a small area; drybrush was too harsh; lipstick and rouge unwieldy and messy. Everything proved to be impractical and all hope seemed lost to give Snow White her little bit of color when the idea of using a dye was proposed. 
Again Ms. Thompson: “Someone suggested a red dye because the blue day we added to give Donald Duck his distinctive sailor-blue never really could be washed off the cell without leaving a bluish stain where the paint had been applied.” 
Ever since the mid 30’s when color became the norm for all the cartoons, not just the “Silly Symphonies,” all paints and inks were made at the studio. During this period as well cells were routinely reused for economic reasons, thus the need to wash them off. Apparently Donald’s special blue color was made with a dye added to the usual powdered pigments. “So we tried that.” As the women gathered around in what must have seemed just another dead-end effort, all eyes became fixed on the red dot which soon became a small glow with no perceptible edge. The hushed silence soon gave way to sighs of relief. The method had finally been found. Now the application.
…
Among the studio’s many inkers (an extremely demanding profession), was one young lady whose training and skill was unique: Helen Ogger. Just being an inker placed one within the elite confines of this most “holy of holies” area of the Nunnery, as the Ink and Paint Department was so called (Walt had strict and quite Victorian views that the sexes not mingle at the workplace, allowing no male personnel save the “gofer” boy and the paymaster “Mr.” Keener to enter this domain of mostly unmarried women ). But Helen was in addition a very fine cartoonist and one of the few women at Disney’s or anywhere else, who could animate.
…
Such a seemingly insignificant detail (as the cheek colors) might be thought not worthy of special mention (she, as well as the other inkers and painters, was given no screen credit). But when one adds up the number of footage required to be tinted freehand on each individual cell, the hours suddenly turn into weeks and months. In fact, such a treatment was never attempted again on such a scale and even today, the publicity stills from “Snow White,” most of which do not have the added blush, bear witness to how that little touch of extra care adds to the vitality we see on the screen. 
The work was done on all close-ups, most medium shots, and even on some long shots. The Queen was also similarly tinted. Hundreds of hours were needed to complete this task, arduous, repetitive and, of course, hard on the eyes. Ultimately a handful of other girls were needed to assist Helen as the clocked ticked toward the deadline.
Helen had to place several cells together on an animation board, one atop the other, just like in the process of animation, in order to get the ‘registration’ right (the spot of red just right in relation to the preceding and following ones) - all of this without any guide. She would work out her own extremes and then ‘animate’ the blush in inbetweens. Her work deserves admiration and gratitude and it is unfortunate that her contribution has remained unknown and her anonymity unaltered during her lifetime. She was paid, as were the rest of the Inkers, $18 a week, which included a half-day on Saturday and the many, many hours of unpaid overtime “Snow White” would require - all given unstintingly, (by everyone involved, it should be added), to a project whose joy in participating was its own reward. 
She eventually became head of Inking and Special Effects and even taught classes in animation at the studio. She left in 1941 (apparently part of the terrible strike that would leave the Disney Studio changed forever), taking her skills with her. She died in Glendale in February of 1980. Perhaps it is safe to say that her departure was critical to the abrupt demise of this now unique effect (it was also used, though on a much smaller scale in both “Pinocchio” and “Fantasia”). None of the other inkers or painters were animators and it is this fact, not just the factor of economy nor the changing tastes, which surely must be considered a reason why such details were never attempted again. The golden age was over.


Also, here’s an interesting article about female cel painters at Disney. I am now fascinated by the idea of writing something with a Depression-era cel painter as a protagonist.


Reblogging because the history geek in me finds this fascinating.    And so does the labor history and the women’s history geek. laylainalaska:

fuckyeahsources:

Nope. But the real story is better. Bolding mine:

The late Ruth Thompson, a cell painter on “Snow White” who later became a multiplane scene planner, recalled: “We tried everything - airbrush, drybrush, even lipstick and rouge, which is perhaps the basis for the legend because we did, in fact, try it. But nothing worked.”
The airbrush was difficult to control on such a small area; drybrush was too harsh; lipstick and rouge unwieldy and messy. Everything proved to be impractical and all hope seemed lost to give Snow White her little bit of color when the idea of using a dye was proposed. 
Again Ms. Thompson: “Someone suggested a red dye because the blue day we added to give Donald Duck his distinctive sailor-blue never really could be washed off the cell without leaving a bluish stain where the paint had been applied.” 
Ever since the mid 30’s when color became the norm for all the cartoons, not just the “Silly Symphonies,” all paints and inks were made at the studio. During this period as well cells were routinely reused for economic reasons, thus the need to wash them off. Apparently Donald’s special blue color was made with a dye added to the usual powdered pigments. “So we tried that.” As the women gathered around in what must have seemed just another dead-end effort, all eyes became fixed on the red dot which soon became a small glow with no perceptible edge. The hushed silence soon gave way to sighs of relief. The method had finally been found. Now the application.
…
Among the studio’s many inkers (an extremely demanding profession), was one young lady whose training and skill was unique: Helen Ogger. Just being an inker placed one within the elite confines of this most “holy of holies” area of the Nunnery, as the Ink and Paint Department was so called (Walt had strict and quite Victorian views that the sexes not mingle at the workplace, allowing no male personnel save the “gofer” boy and the paymaster “Mr.” Keener to enter this domain of mostly unmarried women ). But Helen was in addition a very fine cartoonist and one of the few women at Disney’s or anywhere else, who could animate.
…
Such a seemingly insignificant detail (as the cheek colors) might be thought not worthy of special mention (she, as well as the other inkers and painters, was given no screen credit). But when one adds up the number of footage required to be tinted freehand on each individual cell, the hours suddenly turn into weeks and months. In fact, such a treatment was never attempted again on such a scale and even today, the publicity stills from “Snow White,” most of which do not have the added blush, bear witness to how that little touch of extra care adds to the vitality we see on the screen. 
The work was done on all close-ups, most medium shots, and even on some long shots. The Queen was also similarly tinted. Hundreds of hours were needed to complete this task, arduous, repetitive and, of course, hard on the eyes. Ultimately a handful of other girls were needed to assist Helen as the clocked ticked toward the deadline.
Helen had to place several cells together on an animation board, one atop the other, just like in the process of animation, in order to get the ‘registration’ right (the spot of red just right in relation to the preceding and following ones) - all of this without any guide. She would work out her own extremes and then ‘animate’ the blush in inbetweens. Her work deserves admiration and gratitude and it is unfortunate that her contribution has remained unknown and her anonymity unaltered during her lifetime. She was paid, as were the rest of the Inkers, $18 a week, which included a half-day on Saturday and the many, many hours of unpaid overtime “Snow White” would require - all given unstintingly, (by everyone involved, it should be added), to a project whose joy in participating was its own reward. 
She eventually became head of Inking and Special Effects and even taught classes in animation at the studio. She left in 1941 (apparently part of the terrible strike that would leave the Disney Studio changed forever), taking her skills with her. She died in Glendale in February of 1980. Perhaps it is safe to say that her departure was critical to the abrupt demise of this now unique effect (it was also used, though on a much smaller scale in both “Pinocchio” and “Fantasia”). None of the other inkers or painters were animators and it is this fact, not just the factor of economy nor the changing tastes, which surely must be considered a reason why such details were never attempted again. The golden age was over.


Also, here’s an interesting article about female cel painters at Disney. I am now fascinated by the idea of writing something with a Depression-era cel painter as a protagonist.


Reblogging because the history geek in me finds this fascinating.    And so does the labor history and the women’s history geek.

laylainalaska:

fuckyeahsources:

Nope. But the real story is better. Bolding mine:

The late Ruth Thompson, a cell painter on “Snow White” who later became a multiplane scene planner, recalled: “We tried everything - airbrush, drybrush, even lipstick and rouge, which is perhaps the basis for the legend because we did, in fact, try it. But nothing worked.

The airbrush was difficult to control on such a small area; drybrush was too harsh; lipstick and rouge unwieldy and messy. Everything proved to be impractical and all hope seemed lost to give Snow White her little bit of color when the idea of using a dye was proposed.

Again Ms. Thompson: “Someone suggested a red dye because the blue day we added to give Donald Duck his distinctive sailor-blue never really could be washed off the cell without leaving a bluish stain where the paint had been applied.”

Ever since the mid 30’s when color became the norm for all the cartoons, not just the “Silly Symphonies,” all paints and inks were made at the studio. During this period as well cells were routinely reused for economic reasons, thus the need to wash them off. Apparently Donald’s special blue color was made with a dye added to the usual powdered pigments. “So we tried that.” As the women gathered around in what must have seemed just another dead-end effort, all eyes became fixed on the red dot which soon became a small glow with no perceptible edge. The hushed silence soon gave way to sighs of relief. The method had finally been found. Now the application.

Among the studio’s many inkers (an extremely demanding profession), was one young lady whose training and skill was unique: Helen Ogger. Just being an inker placed one within the elite confines of this most “holy of holies” area of the Nunnery, as the Ink and Paint Department was so called (Walt had strict and quite Victorian views that the sexes not mingle at the workplace, allowing no male personnel save the “gofer” boy and the paymaster “Mr.” Keener to enter this domain of mostly unmarried women ). But Helen was in addition a very fine cartoonist and one of the few women at Disney’s or anywhere else, who could animate.

Such a seemingly insignificant detail (as the cheek colors) might be thought not worthy of special mention (she, as well as the other inkers and painters, was given no screen credit). But when one adds up the number of footage required to be tinted freehand on each individual cell, the hours suddenly turn into weeks and months. In fact, such a treatment was never attempted again on such a scale and even today, the publicity stills from “Snow White,” most of which do not have the added blush, bear witness to how that little touch of extra care adds to the vitality we see on the screen.

The work was done on all close-ups, most medium shots, and even on some long shots. The Queen was also similarly tinted. Hundreds of hours were needed to complete this task, arduous, repetitive and, of course, hard on the eyes. Ultimately a handful of other girls were needed to assist Helen as the clocked ticked toward the deadline.

Helen had to place several cells together on an animation board, one atop the other, just like in the process of animation, in order to get the ‘registration’ right (the spot of red just right in relation to the preceding and following ones) - all of this without any guide. She would work out her own extremes and then ‘animate’ the blush in inbetweens. Her work deserves admiration and gratitude and it is unfortunate that her contribution has remained unknown and her anonymity unaltered during her lifetime. She was paid, as were the rest of the Inkers, $18 a week, which included a half-day on Saturday and the many, many hours of unpaid overtime “Snow White” would require - all given unstintingly, (by everyone involved, it should be added), to a project whose joy in participating was its own reward.

She eventually became head of Inking and Special Effects and even taught classes in animation at the studio. She left in 1941 (apparently part of the terrible strike that would leave the Disney Studio changed forever), taking her skills with her. She died in Glendale in February of 1980. Perhaps it is safe to say that her departure was critical to the abrupt demise of this now unique effect (it was also used, though on a much smaller scale in both “Pinocchio” and “Fantasia”). None of the other inkers or painters were animators and it is this fact, not just the factor of economy nor the changing tastes, which surely must be considered a reason why such details were never attempted again. The golden age was over.

Also, here’s an interesting article about female cel painters at Disney. I am now fascinated by the idea of writing something with a Depression-era cel painter as a protagonist.

Reblogging because the history geek in me finds this fascinating. And so does the labor history and the women’s history geek.

(Source: timblanks)

magpieandwhale:

star-anise:

CHECK OUT HER LEGS.  Peggy Carter moves so wonderfully—stalking along so her shoulders and hips stay level all the way through her stride, one foot landing before the other takes off, knees slightly bent so she can spring forward or absorb a blow, back foot sweeping up around the lead to make sure she’s smooth and steady.
This is a fencer’s walk.  This walk tells me: Peggy knows how to use a sword. 
I bet you that somewhere at home, packed in with all the other relics of her school years, there is a small silver cup from a women’s epée tournament with her name on it.

HEADCANON ACCEPTED.

So headcanony that it may become confused with actual canon for me

magpieandwhale:

star-anise:

CHECK OUT HER LEGS.  Peggy Carter moves so wonderfully—stalking along so her shoulders and hips stay level all the way through her stride, one foot landing before the other takes off, knees slightly bent so she can spring forward or absorb a blow, back foot sweeping up around the lead to make sure she’s smooth and steady.

This is a fencer’s walk.  This walk tells me: Peggy knows how to use a sword. 

I bet you that somewhere at home, packed in with all the other relics of her school years, there is a small silver cup from a women’s epée tournament with her name on it.

HEADCANON ACCEPTED.

So headcanony that it may become confused with actual canon for me

(Source: sarahawkes)

maryhaines:

“I blocked it out until the last moment where all of a sudden it hit me, that this person that I was standing in front of as I know him and have known him for such a long time, that this aspect of our relationship was coming to a close. We embraced and I just burst into tears. We held our embrace for a really long time and I think it was just flooding over us, the importance of this agreement that we’ve had to be in each other’s lives in a very powerful way.”

Gillian Anderson

“I think it was written that Scully gives Mulder a kiss on the forehead. Kim Manners was there [directing], and I was so confused at that point that I didn’t trust my feelings about it because I had so many personal feelings. It was eight years of my life. I didn’t know what would be an appropriate ending. I didn’t know. And when Kim and I read it as we were about to shoot it, he said, ‘We’ve done that 100 times, the whole hand holding and the kiss on the forehead. Let’s do a real kiss.’ I was like, ‘Yeah, that feels right.’”

David Duchovny

“The last shot in the picture was Gillian handing David the baby in her bedroom. David leaned over and gave her a kiss, and the camera then pulled back out of the doorway and just kept going down the hall. We got the shot, and we cut it and printed it; the nurse came and took the baby away. And David put his arms around Gillian, and she put her arms around him, and they stood there for about ten minutes, and never said a word to each other. The tears were just rolling down their faces, and the whole crew stood there and watched this in silence. It was truly one of the most emotional experiences I’ve ever witnessed in my life.”

Kim Manners, director

A show that often frustrated me, but I never felt like it was fucking with me.   In large part because of these actors and a selection of really good writers and directors who were not actually Chris Carter.   Though CC gets credit for knowing when to step back and let the story get told, even if it wasn’t the story he started out to tell

(Source: tracylord)

typingtess:

The original “In the Air Tonight” on TV with a very hot young Don Johnson.

#OhMyMisspentYouth

Ah, yes.  Friday nights babysitting instead of going out with friends, putting the kids to bed and watching this…

allofthefeelings:

uncontinuous:

oparu:

aspacebetween:

ddagent:

oparu:

agentsofshieldconfessions:

I don’t know if anyone else thinks like this, but I was super disappointed that May was able to beat Ward so easily sparring and in battle. His scores and ranking are second only to Romanoff and as much as I love May, she’s no Black Widow and shouldn’t have been a clear winner in any of their fights

Submitted by (x)

I thought he was just behind Romanoff on a few things, not ALL the fighting ever?

In 1.01 Hill assessed Ward and gave him the highest marks since Romanov in Espionage. It’s also worth pointing out that Romanov hasn’t been in SHIELD as long as either May or Coulson, it was in fact Barton who brought her into SHIELD. We have no way of comparing May or Romanov, especially as for the last few years May has been in Administration. 

Fun fact: in the promotional material for the show, Coulson says that May has more black belts than Romanov. 

May knows Ward’s weaknesses, though. His combat assessment is in his file. That’s a huge advantage to anyone who knows how to exploit them.

She also had to look them up to know Ward was good enough to help her take down Phil, who might have been compromised by alien biology and could have been very hard to stop.

Fun Fact: (Since we’re using weird logic to validate shit) Ward was controlled by a part of the Beserker staff. May can handle a whole Beserker Staff twice and not let it control her.

If we go by that logic May > Ward. So IDK about other, but if we based it on this factoid I’d place my bets on May and go get some tea and come back to collect my winnings.

May is no Black Widow yes, but also has anyone considered that maybe she’s better than Black Widow?

Or, even, that Melinda and Natasha aren’t in competition, they’re equally good from different angles?

IDK, I feel like this kind of argument gets dangerously close to “who could win in a fight, Batman or Superman,” while ignoring that what makes the fight interesting is why they’re fighting and what’s at stake.

And in this case, what we see is that Ward was fighting for a cause he didn’t particularly believe in, and May was fighting to protect the world. Ward wanted to impress the supervillain who stockholmed him. May wanted to save her team.

By both comic book and real world logic, I don’t see how this is even a question.

Also: Old age and treachery  life experience can overcome youth and skill.

In both the Ward-May fights, she wins based on doing something totally unexpected - something Ward simply doesn’t notice or see coming.  Pulling the clip?   That’s a technique learned from a lifetime of fighting for your life.   Using the nailgun, not as a weapon aimed at his head or center of mass, but to incapacitate him via his unguarded extremities?  Again - that’s the tactic of someone who has learned via her extensive experience how to compensate for her smaller size.

QuestionSorry, I saw that you're a librarian and I was just wondering if you have any advice for people who want to possibly be a librarian... I've heard getting hired is hard. Answer

ivyblossom:

I get this question a lot, so I’ll answer it in public in case anyone else wants to know the answer. Warning: frustrated librarian snark ahead.

Read More

I worked in libraries from age 16 (as a page, shelving books and running periodical requests to the closed stacks) to age 26 (circulation and reserves supervisor for a small academic library).   I don’t have an MLS, in part for the job thing, and in part because the program available to me when I could have done one was full of librarians like the ones described here. In a world that was already discovering ways to use the web, they were still hand-scribing catalog cards in copperplate.  My student job as an undergrad was in libraries.  I also worked in a large bookstore for several years.   And I volunteered for years for my local Friends of the Library sale, sorting and toting boxes of discards and donations.

Even before technology, this post was true.   Library and bookstore work has almost nothing in common with a bookworm’s fantasies of getting to work in a library or bookstore.  Even if you only consider the part of the job, the part that’s shrinking every day, that deals with printed texts, it’s nothing like the fantasy.  Books are heavy, and dirty, and get moldy, and you have no time to read them because you’re constantly moving them around and dealing with them as objects.  And the non-reading part - a huge part of it involves helping people who don’t love books and reading deal with things that require books and reading.

I loved the whole job, from the dirt on my hands to the people at the public library’s reference desk to the theories behind cataloging and sorting, and if I’d had access to an MLS program that had moved firmly towards the brave new world of Information Technology, I probably would have done that.   But:  It’s really not the job most people think it is.

wanderingchildofthebarricades:

voodoogirl95:

cool thing about choosing literally any major is that someone is gonna make you feel bad about it

Theatre major? You mean waiting tables for the rest of your life.

English major? Oh, so you want to be a school teacher.

Art major? Enjoy poverty you hipster.

Anthropology major? Was history too hard for you?

History major? What can you even do with that?


I’ve heard all of these before.

"So how much do they pay you to compare literature — $3.35 an hour?"

ellidfics:

The unsung heroes.

That was one of the most horrifying, painful, beautiful parts of the movie.  So many of them weren’t prepared, so many were administrators who had no clue that the STRIKE teams had turned, let alone that a killing machine like the Winter Soldier was on the loose.  

So many of them died.

And yet none of them hesitated.  Despite the propaganda Pierce had unleashed, despite their orders, despite everything, they still responded.  Their sacrifice, their heroism - they gave the last full measure of devotion, and I can’t imagine that Steve wouldn’t attend the memorial service, even if he had to use a wheelchair or a cane because his own wounds hadn’t finished healing.

"Captain’s orders" indeed.

This. 

I don’t care if its cheesy, I don’t care if its been done. 

Good people standing up when called upon to do the right thing?  I will always watch them.   This is way more satisfying than a “complex” version of Cap who is “only interesting if he’s a prick.”   People don’t stand up to evil when pricks ask that of them.

Give me more stories that show us all that it is good, and right, and honorable, to stand up for what’s right, and fewer pricks, thank you. 

(Source: dehaans)

hermionesmydawg:

Don’t look at her.
Everything is heightened, from the blinding sun to the smell of gunpowder and the coppery taste of blood he thinks will never leave his mouth. The taste of revenge, of killing one of his torturers, should have cleansed his palate. It didn’t.
Look at him, you killed him.
There’s so much medicine coursing through his veins that everything is a blur. He’s not even sure how he ended up here, he just remembers the one thing on his mind: save the team and save Michelle so that his pain is worth something. So his life is worth something.
Is he even dead? Maybe he’s not dead. You hope he’s not dead, don’t you?
But he still hurts, everywhere. He wonders why they didn’t just kill him when they had the chance. It would have been too merciful, he supposes.
Put your gun in his mouth and pull the trigger, just to make sure he’s dead. Fill his mouth with blood too, watch him suffer like he watched you.
"Deeks, are you okay? What…" Kensi is looking at him in amazement, either from the surprise of his appearance on the rooftop or shock that he was able to pull himself together enough to fire his weapon. Even he doesn’t know he how was able to do it.
Do something. Lie. Just don’t look at her.
He struggles, trying so hard not to look at the face that gave him a reason to live when he just wanted to die. When he sees her now, he can’t separate the image of her from the pain anymore. How can he make it go away? He needs to make it go away.
Maybe just for a second. You really do love her smile.
"I’m good." He swallows and tries not to retch. "You good?"
"Yeah. I’m good." And she smiles.
Look away before she sees what you’ve become. You might never see her smile again.


Stark and gorgeous and heartbreaking.  

hermionesmydawg:

Don’t look at her.

Everything is heightened, from the blinding sun to the smell of gunpowder and the coppery taste of blood he thinks will never leave his mouth. The taste of revenge, of killing one of his torturers, should have cleansed his palate. It didn’t.

Look at him, you killed him.

There’s so much medicine coursing through his veins that everything is a blur. He’s not even sure how he ended up here, he just remembers the one thing on his mind: save the team and save Michelle so that his pain is worth something. So his life is worth something.

Is he even dead? Maybe he’s not dead. You hope he’s not dead, don’t you?

But he still hurts, everywhere. He wonders why they didn’t just kill him when they had the chance. It would have been too merciful, he supposes.

Put your gun in his mouth and pull the trigger, just to make sure he’s dead. Fill his mouth with blood too, watch him suffer like he watched you.

"Deeks, are you okay? What…" Kensi is looking at him in amazement, either from the surprise of his appearance on the rooftop or shock that he was able to pull himself together enough to fire his weapon. Even he doesn’t know he how was able to do it.

Do something. Lie. Just don’t look at her.

He struggles, trying so hard not to look at the face that gave him a reason to live when he just wanted to die. When he sees her now, he can’t separate the image of her from the pain anymore. How can he make it go away? He needs to make it go away.

Maybe just for a second. You really do love her smile.

"I’m good." He swallows and tries not to retch. "You good?"

"Yeah. I’m good." And she smiles.

Look away before she sees what you’ve become. You might never see her smile again.

Stark and gorgeous and heartbreaking.